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Shutting Down Of Border May Lead To Price Rise Of Fruits And Vegetables In San Antonians

San Antonians and lots of across the state might quickly be paying extra for avocados from Mexico, in addition to strawberries, tomatoes, and cucumbers, if President Donald Trump makes good on his menace to close down the southern border.

The warehouse is full of bins and baggage of onions, tomatoes, limes, bananas and extra — all of that are imported from Mexico, the border a mere 160 miles away.

Practically 45% of imported vegetables and fruits come from Mexico, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Day-after-day, vans full of produce roll throughout the southern border. Annually, an estimated $14 billion in Mexican-grown produce is available in.

Vegetables and fruit are Gonzalez’s bread and butter. He’s nervously watching and ready to see if the drastic transfer of shutting down the border to business commerce involves a cross. “I feel we’d see some shortages,” Gonzalez mentioned. “We might see some increased costs.” The warehouse is packed with containers and baggage of onions, tomatoes, limes, bananas and extra — all of that are imported from Mexico, the border a mere 160 miles away.

Almost 45% of imported vegetables and fruits come from Mexico, in response to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Each day, vans filled with produce roll throughout the southern border. Yearly, an estimated $14 billion in Mexican-grown produce is available in.

Vegetables and fruits are Gonzalez’s bread and butter. He’s nervously watching and ready to see if the drastic transfer of shutting down the border to business commerce involves pass.